Practice manager pay gap revealed

New survey reveals significant variations in practice manager pay across GP practices, with huge regional variations and a pay gap of 21% in favour of men in England – although Wales kick this trend 

A survey of practice manager salaries has revealed that a gender pay gap exists in GP practices.

The survey of over 500 practice managers from across the country by Robert Campbell, a retired practice manager and former president of an NHS trade union, and Practice Index, the UK’s leading forum for GP Practice Managers, revealed that the pay gap could be as large as eight per cent.

The survey found that male practice managers are paid, on average, £41,445, while their female counterparts earn £38,114.

National differences

The survey also highlights some interesting regional variations in pay gaps. In England, for example, the average male practice manager’s salary is £42,334, while the average female salary is £33,421, a pay gap of 21%. In Scotland the average male salary is £38,902, while the average female salary is £32,081, creating a gender pay gap of 17%.

In Wales, however, the picture is very different. The average salary for female practice managers is £37,047, while male managers average a salary of £34,965, resulting in a female-positive gender pay gap of six per cent.

Insufficient data was gathered to make any confident claims for Northern Ireland.

Worrying variations

While the pay gap is of concern, the report highlighted some huge variations in pay when comparing practices with similar list sizes.

For example, some practices with a list size of 8,000 pay their practice manager £24,000 per annum, while another paid £58,000 – much more than many managers are earning in larger practices.

“Our survey highlights the fact that there is a gender pay gap within the profession, which is never welcome,” commented James Dillon, Managing Director of Practice Index. “There’s never any excuse for variations on pay based on gender, so we would like to see more done by the various organisations within the NHS, and individual practices, to ensure pay equality.” 

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About the survey

The survey, conducted by Practice Index in March 2018, compiles data from 528 practice managers who responded voluntarily.

Further stats are available by clicking here.

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