Healthcare professionals want their personal data edited or deleted when GDPR comes in

Survey says 78% in the sector intend to take advantage of new ‘right to erasure’

Almost four in five people who work in the healthcare sector are ready to ask for their personal data be edited or deleted once the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into force, a survey has revealed.

The regulation, which will be fully implemented from May 25, will give all EU citizens greater rights over their personal data.

This includes a right to ask for their data to be edited or deleted – as part of a so-called ‘right to be forgotten’ or ‘right to erasure’.

Now businesses are bracing themselves for exactly what this means and how much it will cost them.

A survey by Crown Records Management has revealed how many people could ask for their data to be removed or altered and it seems those in the healthcare sector will be amongst the most determined to protect their data.

The results, after more than 2,000 people across the UK were polled revealed:

  • An incredible 78% of those in the healthcare sector said they may ask for their data to be edited or deleted after May 25 – with 32% saying they would definitely do so.
  • This was higher than many sectors – in HR the figures were 65% and 26%.
  • Across all sectors, 71% said they would (either definitely or possibly) ask a company to edit or delete their data when the new regulation comes into force. In an adult UK population of 52.6 million this could result in an incredible 37.3 million requests.
  • Only eight per cent across all sectors gave a straight ‘no’ when asked if they would want data edited or deleted.
  • More than half of directors across all sectors said they would definitely ask for their personal data to be changed or removed.

The type of data those in the healthcare sector will want edited or deleted was interesting, too.

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Data held for marketing and mailing lists came out top on 67%, followed by financial, banking and credit data on 64%.

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